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Monday, March 24th 2014, 9:21pm

Brokenwings

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Monday, March 24th 2014, 9:36pm

951728

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Very nice but that's not what will happen to our Sun :P
"Imagine a spacecraft of the future, with a crew of a thousand ladies, off for Alpha Centauri, with 2,000 breasts bobbing beautifully and quivering delightfully in response to every weightless movement . . . and I am the commander of the craft, and it is Saturday morning and time for inspection, naturally" - Michael Collins

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Monday, March 24th 2014, 9:39pm

Dhamp

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Or any star, really.

The physics of stellar aging and collapse are staggering.
Have you tried turning it off and on again?

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Monday, March 24th 2014, 9:44pm

951728

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Or any star, really.

The physics of stellar aging and collapse are staggering.
Would be quite a show to say the least
"Imagine a spacecraft of the future, with a crew of a thousand ladies, off for Alpha Centauri, with 2,000 breasts bobbing beautifully and quivering delightfully in response to every weightless movement . . . and I am the commander of the craft, and it is Saturday morning and time for inspection, naturally" - Michael Collins

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Monday, March 24th 2014, 9:47pm

Dhamp

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Best observed from a long, long way away.

To give you an idea, before our Sun dies, it will swell so large it will engulf Earth.
Have you tried turning it off and on again?

6

Monday, March 24th 2014, 10:03pm

951728

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Well that's debated. Due to the loss of the Sun's mass before it expands, the Earth will be at a further orbit.
"Imagine a spacecraft of the future, with a crew of a thousand ladies, off for Alpha Centauri, with 2,000 breasts bobbing beautifully and quivering delightfully in response to every weightless movement . . . and I am the commander of the craft, and it is Saturday morning and time for inspection, naturally" - Michael Collins

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Monday, March 24th 2014, 10:09pm

Dhamp

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Well that's debated. Due to the loss of the Sun's mass before it expands, the Earth will be at a further orbit.

The Sun won't lose mass, not noticably.
Have you tried turning it off and on again?

8

Tuesday, March 25th 2014, 7:06pm

Brokenwings

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Im currently working on a Orbit Animation. Its not done yet, still have to animate the roation and the change the distance beetwen the planets.
But looks not bad so far i guess.

;)

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Wednesday, March 26th 2014, 9:48pm

951728

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Well that's debated. Due to the loss of the Sun's mass before it expands, the Earth will be at a further orbit.

The Sun won't lose mass, not noticably.
"By the time the Sun has entered the asymptotic red giant branch, the orbits of the planets will have drifted outwards due to a loss of roughly 30% of the Sun's present mass. Most of this mass will be lost as the solar wind increases. Also, tidal acceleration will help boost the Earth to a higher orbit (similar to what the Earth does to the moon). If it were only for this, Earth would probably remain outside the Sun. However, current research suggests that after the Sun becomes a red giant, Earth will be pulled in owing to tidal deceleration." - Schröder, K.-P.; Smith, R.C. (2008 ). "Distant future of the Sun and Earth revisited".


30% is a lot.


"Imagine a spacecraft of the future, with a crew of a thousand ladies, off for Alpha Centauri, with 2,000 breasts bobbing beautifully and quivering delightfully in response to every weightless movement . . . and I am the commander of the craft, and it is Saturday morning and time for inspection, naturally" - Michael Collins

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Wednesday, March 26th 2014, 9:49pm

951728

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Im currently working on a Orbit Animation. Its not done yet, still have to animate the roation and the change the distance beetwen the planets.
But looks not bad so far i guess.

;)
Looking good :thumbup:
"Imagine a spacecraft of the future, with a crew of a thousand ladies, off for Alpha Centauri, with 2,000 breasts bobbing beautifully and quivering delightfully in response to every weightless movement . . . and I am the commander of the craft, and it is Saturday morning and time for inspection, naturally" - Michael Collins

11

Wednesday, March 26th 2014, 10:26pm

Dhamp

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Well that's debated. Due to the loss of the Sun's mass before it expands, the Earth will be at a further orbit.

The Sun won't lose mass, not noticably.
"By the time the Sun has entered the asymptotic red giant branch, the orbits of the planets will have drifted outwards due to a loss of roughly 30% of the Sun's present mass. Most of this mass will be lost as the solar wind increases. Also, tidal acceleration will help boost the Earth to a higher orbit (similar to what the Earth does to the moon). If it were only for this, Earth would probably remain outside the Sun. However, current research suggests that after the Sun becomes a red giant, Earth will be pulled in owing to tidal deceleration." - Schröder, K.-P.; Smith, R.C. (2008 ). "Distant future of the Sun and Earth revisited".


30% is a lot.



Not in astrophysical terms!

If it has roughly the right amount of zeros, it's within tolerance - the Earth will still be within the current Goldilocks zone at ~1.4AU away. The Sun will expand to ~1.6+_0.1 AU away.

The uncertainty on Schroder's revision of Reimer's law is pretty damn hazy.
Have you tried turning it off and on again?

12

Wednesday, March 26th 2014, 10:28pm

Dhamp

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Im currently working on a Orbit Animation. Its not done yet, still have to animate the roation and the change the distance beetwen the planets.
But looks not bad so far i guess.

;)

I'd recommend not doing the distance between the planets to the same scale as their relative sizes!

It's looking good so far - don't forget the spins aren't all along the same axis and direction!
Have you tried turning it off and on again?

13

Sunday, March 30th 2014, 1:24pm

this thread is not constructive!
I

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